Gygaxian Quotient

Developed in 1246 AD, the Gygaxian Quotient was derived from the proclamations of Socrates. The famous philosopher would give lessons to a limited number of students every day. Monks in southern Greece uncovered lesson chambers that would seat a comfortable 35 people with area for an additional 7. They also uncovered a large chest filled with stones with numbers carved into the sides. It was said that Socrates would have the students roll these stones and add their age to the result of the roll. If the number was less than 35, they would take a seat but if it was more, they would have to subtract 35 from the roll and take that result after the original 35 people had taken their seats.

There are still several monasteries today that spend hours placing the monks in their lesson chambers using this same method.

Gygaxian Quotient

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